Fwd: Ali Agah Oral's Abstract

Ali Agah aliagah at stanford.edu
Tue Jun 5 09:48:16 PDT 2007


Hi everybody,

I will be giving my orals this coming Thursday at 
9am, and you are more than welcome to join if you 
have interest in sigma-delta ADCs or bio-sensors 
for DNA sequencing (or even neither one!). Here is the orals announcement.

Best,
Ali Agah.

Title: A High-Resolution Low-Power Oversampling 
ADC with Extended-Range for Biosensor Arrays

Date: Thursday June 7, 2007
Time: 9:00am (Refreshments served at 8:45am)
Location: CIS-X Auditorium, Center for Integrated Systems

Abstract:
There has recently been great interest in 
development of low-cost, high-throughput DNA 
sequencing platforms. Such platforms can bring de 
novo sequencing to every laboratory and hospital 
and open up new and exciting opportunities for 
point-of-care genetic studies, which will 
revolutionize personalized medicine and 
metagenomics. We have developed an integrated 
platform for miniaturizing Pyrosequencing – A DNA 
sequencing-by-synthesis technique, which is based 
on bioluminescence detection.

The main challenge of the detection in the 
miniaturized Pyrosequencing platform is 
sensitivity. The image sensors traditionally used 
in bioluminescence sensing applications are 
state-of-the-art astronomical-grade CCD cameras 
to achieve the high sensitivity requirements. 
However, CMOS image sensors are becoming very 
attractive substitutes due to low-cost and higher 
flexibility in design with comparable level of 
sensitivity. In order to achieve ultra-low 
quantization noise levels and to provide a 
calibration tool for up-stream sensing elements, 
high-resolution analog-to-digital conversion is essential.

A calibration-free, high-resolution ADC designed 
for a mega-pixel sensor array for Pyrosequencing 
is presented. The ADC employs a two-step 
architecture in which the residual error from a 
second-order incremental sigma-delta modulator is 
encoded using a successive approximation ADC. The 
ADC has been integrated in 0.18um CMOS technology 
and achieves a dynamic range of 90.1dB and a peak 
SNDR of 86.3dB at a conversion rate of 
1MSample/sec with 38mW of power consumption.




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>Subject: Ali Agah Oral's Abstract
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>
>A High-Resolution Low-Power Oversampling ADC with
>Extended-Range for Bio-Sensor Arrays
>
>Ali Agah
>Department of Electrical Engineering & Stanford Genome Technology Center
>Stanford University
>
>Advisor: James D. Plummer
>
>Date: Thursday June 7, 2007
>Time: 9:00am (Refreshments served at 8:45am)
>Location: CIS-X Auditorium, Center for Integrated Systems
>
>Abstract:
>There has recently been great interest in
>development of low-cost, high-throughput DNA
>sequencing platforms. Such platforms can bring de
>novo sequencing to every laboratory and hospital
>and open up new and exciting opportunities for
>point-of-care genetic studies, which will
>revolutionize personalized medicine and
>metagenomics. We have developed an integrated
>platform for miniaturizing Pyrosequencing ­ A DNA
>sequencing-by-synthesis technique, which is based
>on bioluminescence detection.
>
>The main challenge of the detection in the
>miniaturized Pyrosequencing platform is
>sensitivity. The image sensors traditionally used
>in bioluminescence sensing applications are
>state-of-the-art astronomical-grade CCD cameras
>to achieve the high sensitivity requirements.
>However, CMOS image sensors are becoming very
>attractive substitutes due to low-cost and higher
>flexibility in design with comparable level of
>sensitivity. In order to achieve ultra-low
>quantization noise levels and to provide a
>calibration tool for up-stream sensing elements,
>high-resolution analog-to-digital conversion is
>essential.
>
>A calibration-free, high-resolution ADC designed
>for a mega-pixel sensor array for Pyrosequencing
>is presented. The ADC employs a two-step
>architecture in which the residual error from a
>second-order incremental sigma-delta modulator is
>encoded using a successive approximation ADC. The
>ADC has been integrated in 0.18um CMOS technology
>and achieves a dynamic range of 90.1dB and a peak
>SNDR of 86.3dB at a conversion rate of
>1MSample/sec with 38mW of power consumption.
>
>
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