REMINDER: Seminar Today - Nathan Klejwa, "Now we need a 5th order aberration-corrected TEM to see what’s gone wrong", Tuesday, February 21, 2012, 4-5pm Allen 101X Auditorium

Jose Padovani josep at stanford.edu
Tue Feb 21 12:02:26 PST 2012


Hi all,

Please plan on attending this interesting seminar TODAY by Nathan Klejwa from Halcyon Molecular, Inc..

Tuesday, February 21, 2012, 4:00-5:00 
Allen 101X Auditorium

Title:
Now we need a 5th order aberration-corrected TEM to see what’s gone wrong

Speaker:
Nathan Klejwa
Project Manager, Halcyon Molecular, Inc., Redwood City, California


Abstract:
Low-cost, widely available DNA sequence data will make medicine an information science, allowing doctors and patients to predict drug reactions, target specific cells, and tailor treatments to individual patients. Current sequencing methods use short read-length data mapped to a genomic reference to detect small-scale genomic variation in the “easy to read” sections of the genome. Structural variations, which occur over large genomic distances, are extremely difficult to detect with these  methods, and are common determinants of phenotypic variation and diseases such as cancer. Halcyon Molecular seeks to use high-resolution electron microscopy to directly read long, contiguous sections of human DNA and create truly de novo genomes. This talk will highlight some of the technical challenges and interesting solutions unique to this highly interdisciplinary approach to DNA sequencing.

Short Bio:
Nathan Klejwa is currently a PhD student at Stanford University and an engineering project manager at Halcyon Molecular, Inc. His research includes rapid prototyping and low-cost processing for reel-to-reel compatible microsystems. This work aims to minimize complex, time-intensive, and expensive fabrication steps and maximize design flexibility, both for academic prototyping and full-scale production. During the past year at Halcyon Molecular, he has overseen efforts in direct DNA manipulation, biological sample preparation, microscopy infrastructure, and microfabrication.


Hope to see you all there,
Jose

--
Jose Padovani
Graduate Student
Electrical Engineering Department
Stanford University
(650) 796-1971







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