Question about SiC Processing at SNF

Mary Tang mtang at snf.stanford.edu
Tue Mar 23 07:19:00 PST 2004


Hi Shabbir --

Here's my two cents (although Jim and Mike are by far more knowledgeable in
this regard...)  SiC can be very "dirty", depending on the source.  So, I would
suspect that unless you have analytical data from the service which is doing
your substrates that shows it is of electronic grade, I believe the assumption
is that your SiC would be "dirty" and therefore not allowed in any "clean" or
"semiclean" equipment.  So, for solvent cleaning and acid etching, you would
have to use wbsolvent and wbgeneral.  For metal deposition, you could use
metalica or the innotec (though you might have to consider the size are the
substrates and/or how you would mount them in these tools.)  I don't know what
process or equipment you would need for ohmic contact annealing.

I know several people have used SiC, but generally only in "dirty" tools.  Only
one person has made a request for SiC processing in clean tools since we've
been publishing the SpecMat approvals (although I've been delinquent about
posting them for the past few months, though plan to do so, soon).  This person
was Nihat Okulan, and I don't believe there's been a follow up on analysis.

Jim and Mike have a lot more experience with SpecMat issues and can tell you if
there are any other concerns.

Mary

"Shabbir A. Bashar, Ph.D." wrote:

> Hi everyone,
>
> I am interested in processing Silicon Carbide wafer samples in the fab.
> This would involve solvent cleaning and acid etching.  Furthermore, I will
> need to do metal deposition and ohmic contact annealing.  I do not have any
> need to use the thermal furnaces for my SiC samples.  Please advise whether
> anyone has done this before and if so which tools they were using for the
> processing steps I mentioned above.
>
> If no one has used SiC in the fab before, please let me know if this would
> be allowed and if so what approval steps I need to go through.
>
> Thanks in advance.
>
> Shabbir Bashar

--
Mary X. Tang, Ph.D.
Stanford Nanofabrication Facility
CIS Room 136, Mail Code 4070
Stanford, CA  94305
(650)723-9980
mtang at stanford.edu
http://snf.stanford.edu





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