Using chemical Fluoroetch solvent for teflon etching to SNF

Mary Tang mtang at stanford.edu
Tue Mar 6 14:33:34 PST 2012


Hi Noureddine --

Please answer the following:

1.  Where do you plan to use this and what is the protocol (i.e., is 
heating required? how long is the etch?)
2.  How will you dispose of the used material?
3.  How much material are you bringing in?  Do you plan to store unused 
material?  Where?  (The EH&S website should indicate which storage class 
this material falls into and what compatible materials may be stored 
with it.)
4.  Will this be routine or is it a one-time experiment?

I really don't know, but suspect this stuff will smell (naphthalene -- 
mothballs?)  Also, the PEL is low at 10 ppm -- the lowest level allowed 
in the lab, so extra care in handling this and anything that comes into 
contact with this chemical (gloves, wipes, labware, tweezers) would need 
to be scrupulously handled only in the exhausted area of the hood.  By 
the way, you should be aware that the solvent may be, I believe, one of 
the family of methyl and ethyl glycol ethers that most US companies are 
trying to phase out, because of links to reproductive problems.   So 
again, more care.  If you could provide a detailed description of your 
procedures (volumes, times, rinses, disposal, etc.) it would be appreciated.

There is a weekly meeting where SpecMat requests like this can be 
discussed.  John B -- should this be on this Thursday's agenda?

Mary

On 3/6/2012 1:52 PM, Noureddine Tayebi wrote:
> Dear all,
>
> I'm writing to request permission to use a solvent called Fluoroetch that is made by a company called acton technologies (http://www.actontech.com/fluor1.htm).  The solvent is used to etch teflon surface to make it adhesive to glue (glue will not be used in the fab). Fluoropolymer films and sheest such as teflon must be etched on one side to bond them. We are looking into glueing microtubings made of teflon.
>
> The Fluoroetch solvent is a Sodium naphthalene complex in glycol ether. It is both flammable and toxic. The Flash point is at 158 F (70 C) and the autoignition temperature is at 370 F (188 C). The toxic elements are 2-Methoxyethyl ether and Sodium Naphthalene complex.
>
> I have attached the MSDS sheet for further information.  Please do get back to me ASAP as I'm looking to using it within the next week or so.
>
> Thank you for your time and consideration and I look forward to hearing from you very soon,
>
> Best regards,
>
>
> Noureddine


-- 
Mary X. Tang, Ph.D.
Stanford Nanofabrication Facility
Paul G. Allen Room 136, Mail Code 4070
Stanford, CA  94305
(650)723-9980
mtang at stanford.edu
http://snf.stanford.edu




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