Using chemical Fluoroetch solvent for teflon etching to SNF

Noureddine Tayebi ntayebi at stanford.edu
Thu Mar 15 12:08:57 PDT 2012


Sorry Mary I did not get back to you earlier on this. I wanted to make sure I could replace the solvent by something milder. So I was awaiting to hear from the company.  I checked all your recommendations with them and unfortunately I cannot replace it with another solvent as it will not have the same effect.

I will write the procedure and send it to you guys. Unfortunately the response was late and I missed the Thursday meeting 

Thanks

Noureddine

----- Original Message -----
From: "Mary Tang" <mtang at stanford.edu>
To: "Noureddine Tayebi" <ntayebi at stanford.edu>
Cc: SpecMat at snf.stanford.edu, "maurice stevens" <maurice at stanford.edu>, "John Bumgarner" <jwb2005 at stanford.edu>, "Uli Thumser" <uli at snf.stanford.edu>
Sent: Wednesday, March 7, 2012 8:46:13 AM
Subject: Re: Using chemical Fluoroetch solvent for teflon etching to SNF

Thanks Noureddine --

PLEASE do not dilute with water or neutralize.  If you are using it neat 
at wbsolvent, please collect waste in an appropriate container (do not 
use the shared carboy) and dispose/label the waste as per standard 
wbsolvent/wbgeneral procedures.  (It looks like if you dilute with 
water, you get a very alkaline solution.)

If at all possible, it would be ideal to have a propylene glycol solvent 
equivalent of this (these are the accepted alternatives to methyl- and 
ethyl glycols.)  My superficial google search didn't turn anything up, 
but if you are aware of other alternatives, please do follow up.

Because this is one of the solvents we'd like to minimize (if not 
completely get rid of), there should be a "get rid of" date (Dec. '12?) 
on the bottle.  Also, any use beyond your proposal (more bottles, new 
users, other stations) must be reviewed by SpecMat.

Could you please write up a detailed summary of this request, including 
any application notes and detailed procedures on the chemical handling?  
The summary should be distributed to this list of staff.  John B would 
like such requests to be presented to the Thursday SpecMat meeting at 
2:30 pm in room 115 -- so please contact him about getting on the agenda.

Thanks,

Mary

On 3/6/2012 3:44 PM, Noureddine Tayebi wrote:
> Hi Mary,
>
> Thank you for your prompt reply. Here are the answers to your questions
>
> 1.  Where do you plan to use this and what is the protocol (i.e., is heating required? how long is the etch?)
>
> No heating (RT use). Etch is ~ 1 min at the most. Since it's a solvent, I was thinking of using it in the solvent bench (wbsolvent). Minimal amount is needed (4 ml)
>
> 2.  How will you dispose of the used material?
>
> As mentioned in the MSDS sheet, we need to dilute it in water and neutralize in acetic or hydrochloric acid.
>
> 3.  How much material are you bringing in?  Do you plan to store unused
> material?  Where?  (The EH&S website should indicate which storage class
> this material falls into and what compatible materials may be stored
> with it.)
>
> I want to purchase the smallest container the company sells, which is 1 pint (0.47 liter). Yes, I want to store it. It should be stored with flammable liquid storage (I guess with solvents)
>
>
> 4.  Will this be routine or is it a one-time experiment?
>
> very sporadically: twice or three times max a year.
>
> 5. If you could provide a detailed description of your
> procedures (volumes, times, rinses, disposal, etc.) it would be appreciated.
>
> 4 ml each time of use (no more than 3 times a year).  I just need to dip the end of the tubings into the solvent. Disposal is described above.
>
>
> I checked all your warnings and they're all correct.  I will dispose of any gloves and wipes in the solvent waste bins, will use my own labware for it and have tweezers go through acetone, ipa dips (1- mins each) after use.
>
> Let me know if you have any recommendations and I would really appreciate it if you could discuss it this Thursday :o).
>
> Thanks and best regards,
>
> Noureddine
>
>
>
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: "Mary Tang"<mtang at stanford.edu>
> To: "Noureddine Tayebi"<ntayebi at stanford.edu>
> Cc: SpecMat at snf.stanford.edu, "maurice stevens"<maurice at stanford.edu>, "John Bumgarner"<jwb2005 at stanford.edu>
> Sent: Tuesday, March 6, 2012 2:33:34 PM
> Subject: Re: Using chemical Fluoroetch solvent for teflon etching to SNF
>
> Hi Noureddine --
>
> Please answer the following:
>
> 1.  Where do you plan to use this and what is the protocol (i.e., is
> heating required? how long is the etch?)
> 2.  How will you dispose of the used material?
> 3.  How much material are you bringing in?  Do you plan to store unused
> material?  Where?  (The EH&S website should indicate which storage class
> this material falls into and what compatible materials may be stored
> with it.)
> 4.  Will this be routine or is it a one-time experiment?
>
> I really don't know, but suspect this stuff will smell (naphthalene --
> mothballs?)  Also, the PEL is low at 10 ppm -- the lowest level allowed
> in the lab, so extra care in handling this and anything that comes into
> contact with this chemical (gloves, wipes, labware, tweezers) would need
> to be scrupulously handled only in the exhausted area of the hood.  By
> the way, you should be aware that the solvent may be, I believe, one of
> the family of methyl and ethyl glycol ethers that most US companies are
> trying to phase out, because of links to reproductive problems.   So
> again, more care.  If you could provide a detailed description of your
> procedures (volumes, times, rinses, disposal, etc.) it would be appreciated.
>
> There is a weekly meeting where SpecMat requests like this can be
> discussed.  John B -- should this be on this Thursday's agenda?
>
> Mary
>
> On 3/6/2012 1:52 PM, Noureddine Tayebi wrote:
>> Dear all,
>>
>> I'm writing to request permission to use a solvent called Fluoroetch that is made by a company called acton technologies (http://www.actontech.com/fluor1.htm).  The solvent is used to etch teflon surface to make it adhesive to glue (glue will not be used in the fab). Fluoropolymer films and sheest such as teflon must be etched on one side to bond them. We are looking into glueing microtubings made of teflon.
>>
>> The Fluoroetch solvent is a Sodium naphthalene complex in glycol ether. It is both flammable and toxic. The Flash point is at 158 F (70 C) and the autoignition temperature is at 370 F (188 C). The toxic elements are 2-Methoxyethyl ether and Sodium Naphthalene complex.
>>
>> I have attached the MSDS sheet for further information.  Please do get back to me ASAP as I'm looking to using it within the next week or so.
>>
>> Thank you for your time and consideration and I look forward to hearing from you very soon,
>>
>> Best regards,
>>
>>
>> Noureddine
>


-- 
Mary X. Tang, Ph.D.
Stanford Nanofabrication Facility
Paul G. Allen Room 136, Mail Code 4070
Stanford, CA  94305
(650)723-9980
mtang at stanford.edu
http://snf.stanford.edu




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